Selected SLC Research


Policy Analysis | December 22, 2010

Census Results and State Implications

Mikko Lindberg

Since 1790, the United States, as required by Article 1, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution, has conducted a census every 10 years, tabulating the nation's population for the purpose of allocating congressional districts among the states. The census also is important due to its effects on the allocation of federal funds to state and local governments. Further, the data from the census still is used to allocate congressional seats among the 50 states and is used by the states to redraw the boundaries of political districts such as state legislative lines, city council lines and the like. The resident population of the United States on April 1, 2010, was 308,745,538, an increase of 9.7 percent over the 281,421,906 counted during the 2000 Census. The following table provides details on the congressional seat changes in the Southern region, and the 2010 Census site provides further manipulable data.

CONGRESSIONAL SEAT CHANGES IN THE SOUTHERN STATES

State or Region Representatives Average Number of Constituents per Representative Seats Lost or Gained
Alabama 7 686,140 0
Arkansas 4 731,557 0
Florida 27 700,029 2
Georgia 14 694,826 1
Kentucky 6 725,101 0
Louisiana 6 758,994 -1
Mississippi 4 744,560 0
Missouri 8 751,435 -1
North Carolina 13 735,829 0
Oklahoma 5 752,976 0
South Carolina 7 663,711 1
Tennessee 9 708,381 0
Texas 36 701,901 4
Virginia 11 730,703 0
West Virginia 3 619,938 0
SLC Total 160 N/A 6

Source: U.S. Census